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Thursday, February 19, 2009

Filleting method for solids


Learn a few techniques for using the FilletEdge command over an entire model.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thanks.... this tutorial was of great help since i always found Filleting the most difficult task.
very well executed....

Anonymous said...

1:38 "now that I have a radius of 2, any fillet that joins with that should be less than 2"

I find that assumption baffling...Why can't a mating fillet have a larger radius? That and other filleting quirks have resulted in my work flow where I surface model in Rhino, stitch everything together and do parametric filleting in Solid works which is a lot more forgiving, even if the adjacent fillet is greater than 2 :)

pgolay said...

Hello- the thing is that Rhino does not know a fillet is a fillet once it is created. So, rolling ball, so to speak, larger than the radius of the existing fillet will create a fillet surface that is self intersecting in Rhino. In feature based applications, fillets are features and when you modify them, they can all be recalculated together. In Rhino, they all need to be done at the same time for those intersections to be resolved. In general, in Rhino, make all the bigger fillets first, then wrap the smaller ones around them.

-Pascal pascal@mcneel.com

Bartjan said...

Thanks so much, it was a great great help!

Anonymous said...

Hi, can anyone tell how how do you edit a fillet on a model after it has been applied?

Brian James said...

Rhino is not a parametric modeling program and you cannot edit the radius of a fillet after creation. You can however extract and untrim surfaces and make a new fillet. Pascal's comment above will also help explain how Rhino is different from parametric modelers.

Anonymous said...

This just helps me a lot. Thank you so much. :)

Jeff Dale said...

I have been trying to use FilletEdge to work on my models, but when I use it, the bevel shows up under the cap and side edge. Clearly I am doing something terribly wrong. Help!

Brian James said...

Hi Jeff,

It sounds like there isn't enough space between the surfaces for the fillet to trim and join. In complicated edges that bend back on themselves, it can be useful to try the other rail types like distance between rails and also decrease the radius used. Send in a model noting the edge before and after to tech@mcneel.com if you still need help.